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Classics, Travel

Emperor Nero’s rotating dining room ‘discovered’

A brick structure brick structure incorporating a pillar was discovered during maintenance works at Romes Forum Romanum

A brick structure brick structure incorporating a pillar was discovered during maintenance works at Rome's Forum Romanum

Emperor Nero’s rotating dining room ‘discovered’

Archeologists in Rome believe they have found the remains of a legendary rotating dining room which the Emperor Nero built to entertain his guests.

Remains of the fabled dining hall have been discovered on the city’s Palatine Hill, where emperors traditionally built their most lavish palaces.

The hall is said to have had a revolving wooden floor which allowed guests to survey a ceiling painted with stars and equipped with panels from which flower petals and perfume would shower onto the tables below.

The remains of the room were found by archeologists excavating the Domus Aurea, or Golden House, which was built for Nero during his reign from 54 to 68AD.

The leader of the four month dig, Françoise Villedieu, said her team discovered part of a circular room which was supported by a pillar with a diameter of more than 13 feet.

The Roman historian Suetonius described the unique revolving room in his Lives of the Caesars, written about 60 years after Nero’s death.

“The chief banqueting room was circular and revolved perpetually, night and day, in imitation of the motion of the celestial bodies,” he wrote.

Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, the recently departed head of the British School at Rome, an archeological institute, said: “People have been trying to find the rotating dining room for a long time. We don’t have much idea about it except for what Suetonius tells us. It could have had a revolving floor, or possibly a revolving ceiling. “If they really have discovered it, that would be exciting.”

Rome’s commissioner for archaeology, Roberto Cecchi, said funds would be made available to help archeologists carry out further investigation and try to verify whether they have indeed found Nero’s dining room.

Nero established during his lifetime a reputation for cruelty and megalomania before committing suicide in AD 68.

Among the monuments he erected was a giant gilded statue of himself, known as the Colossus, which gave its name to the Colosseum amphitheatre.

UK Telegraph   29 Sept. 2009

Full article here

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About steveblizard

Steve Blizard commenced his financial planning career in 1988 from a background of life insurance broking, a field in which he still works. He is a member of the Financial Planning Association and the Responsible Investment Association. His experience ranges from administration of Superannuation to advice regarding insurance, retirement, remuneration and investment planning. Steve is an accredited Remuneration Consultant, specialising in salary packaging. He is a columnist for the Swan Magazine and the WA Business News

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